Content Localizer, Content Marketing, Copywriting, Social Media, Translation

More Than Just Translations

Hello everyone!

Today I want to talk about how as translators we can actually do a lot more than just translate.

Let’s talk about different language-related areas for translators.

Transcription

Transcription varies from translation in that it involves audio or video as the source instead of a document. You have to listen to the audio and transcribe it in a document along with the corresponding time codes.

Most of the times, the audio will be in your native language, but it can also be in your second one. And you might be asked to transcribe and translate an audio, which means that you have to transcribe the audio and then translate it. I work with English and Spanish (Spanish being my native language), so I could get an audio in Spanish to transcribe it, and then translate it into English. It could also be the other way around.

Copywriting

Copywriting is the process of writing persuasive marketing and promotional materials that motivate people to take some form of action, such as make a purchase, click on a link, donate to a cause, or schedule a consultation.

These materials can include written promotions that are published in print or online. They can also include materials that are spoken, such as scripts used for videos or commercials.

The text in these materials is known as “copy,” hence the name “copywriting.”

This is a sort of project that you will most likely work on in your native language.

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Localization

Language localization is the process of adapting a product’s translation to a specific country or region. It is the second phase of a larger process of product translation and cultural adaptation to account for differences in distinct markets, a process known as internationalization and localization.

It doesn’t always have to be a product or a marketing campaign. You can also localize video games and language-learning websites like I do with FluentU. I localize their English videos into Spanish for Latin American learners of English.

Subtitling

Subtitling is the process of adding text to any audio-visual media to express the message that is being spoken. Essentially, subtitles are a written abridgment of the spoken audio. They allow people to read and understand what is being said, even if they don’t understand the language of the speakers. And without subtitles, it would not be possible to grasp the subtleties contained in verbal communications.

Subtitles can basically be added to anything that includes moving pictures, but are most commonly used on film and television, promotional and corporate videos, and increasingly becoming more popular on YouTube and internet videos.

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Language Consultancy

Language consultancy consists of the analysis of a client’s language needs in order to develop solutions that optimize the translation process. This may include support in the drafting of documents or the analysis of document workflows or special projects. The workload for this type of service depends greatly on the complexity of each individual case.

Cultural Consultancy

Cultural consultancy is similar to language consultancy, but in this case, it is more about providing feedback about cultural aspects than language aspects. For instance, I did a cultural consultancy for a video game that took place in the former Maya and Inca empires, so they wanted someone from either culture to help them reassure that the cultural aspects presented in the video game were as close as possible to the original ones, to make it as credible as possible for the users.

Transcreation

Transcreation is the merger of two words: translation and creation. It’s an intricate form of translating that preserves the original intent, context, emotion, and tone. Originally conceived by marketing and advertising professionals, the goal of transcreation is to duplicate the message thoughtfully and seamlessly, without audiences realizing a translation ever occurred. The finished product should give the audience an identical emotional experience as the source message.

Have you worked in any of these areas before? If not, which ones interest you the most? I would love to read you in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe!

Until the next time, take and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Content Marketing, Social Media, Translation

Content Marketing

Hello everyone! Today I want to talk about Content Marketing for translators.

We think that Content Marketing is not important for translators but actually, it can make a big difference in your business.

Content marketing is one of the main tactics every brand and business uses, making it no exception to the translation industry.

Here are some important concepts in Content Marketing that I’ve learned in different webinars and I wanted to share with you.

Definition of Content Marketing

Content marketing consists of marketing actions that revolve around various types of content created in a timely and relevant manner that will get more leads, sales, and allow brands to reach their goals.

The types of content mentioned can be anything from blog articles and email marketing content to infographics, social media posts, or e-books.

Content marketing aims to get more traffic to a website, generate more leads, and allow marketers to distinguish between qualified and non-qualified leads. But that is not all, as great content helps brands to establish their brand name as authorities in their niche and build a community that will be engaged and interested from the beginning.

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The Content

What do your customers like? Why do they need translation services? And most important, how do they search for those services?

If your prospects care about legal sworn translators, this would be where you need to focus. If they’re looking for “English to Spanish legal translators in Guatemala city”, this is the keyword you need to create content around.

Keywords will give you topics on your blog posts, while blog posts and your website will provide you with enough material to base your social media posts around.

SEO

Now let’s talk about the basics of how the translation industry needs content that search engines will love.

This is where SEO comes into play. Creating content that search engines will notice is the best way to get more people to your website. It’s also the most cost-efficient way, as it is free.

Use online tools to help you understand and optimize posts for the keywords your prospects use, as I mentioned before. The best keywords are the long-tail keywords – notice the “English to Spanish legal translators in Guatemala city” above? This is precisely the keyword that interests your prospective clients.

Use popular keywords with a high search volume but low competition for your posts to rank quickly. And don’t forget to use your main keyword everywhere!

Also, don’t forget to research keyword variants. Repeating just one keyword paves the way for a dull post that prospects won’t enjoy. Use your tools to find variations that prospects are searching for and include them in your posts.

Generating Leads

If content marketing were only about posts, then it wouldn’t have worked, no matter how hard a marketer tried.

And there is no better way to know it’s working than seeing more leads coming into your translation business, getting to know your work, and interacting with you. But how is this going to happen?

You will need lead generation tools, such as landing pages, subscription forms, and lead magnets.

The lead magnet is something people will expect in exchange for their email addresses. It can be anything. From an e-book and a template to a free translation or a sample of your work.

Again, use SEO tools to find the right keywords and make sure that your prospects will bump into your landing page or your website and subscription form.

Now, let’s assume that you’ve created your content and have captured the email of as many leads as you would’ve liked. What could you do next?

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Distribution

Your efforts in making content such as blog posts, videos, posts on social media, even interactive elements like games will all be in vain if there is no channel where you can distribute them.

So, first of all, you need to create social media profiles that will resonate with your audience and will help you attract more people and then take all steps necessary.

Sharing your posts on your translation business’s Facebook and Instagram pages will be helpful as well. Ask your audience to share your post with their followers and ask for feedback or a general question that will warrant engagement.

The more the engagement, the better the algorithm reacts, and this goes for all social media platforms.

If one of your posts performs well, you can always repurpose it and have more content to distribute to your social media platforms.

Content marketing can help all industries, including the translation industry, provided you create useful and informative content.

Do you have any experience with content marketing? Let’s start a conversation in the comments!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

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