Brand Ambassador, Content Editor, Social Media, Translation

“False Friends” Words

Hello everyone!

Recently, I gathered with some great colleagues for a Zoom “coffee”, and the topic was the infamous “false friends” words in Spanish and English.

Because Spanish and English share a lot of words with Latin roots, it’s easy to understand each language. But sometimes words with the same origin take a separate path in each language, or words with different origins resemble each other by coincidence. That can mean trouble!

So, here are some of the most common “false friends” and their meanings:

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ASISTIR (Spanish) – ASSIST (English):

Although they look quite similar, they don’t mean the same. “Asistir” in Spanish means to attend, to be present at (a place). “Assist” in English means to help.

CARPETA (Spanish) – CARPET (English):

Another similar one! “Carpeta” in Spanish means folder (and in some countries the word “fólder” is used instead). “Carpet” in English means carpet.

CASUALIDAD (Spanish) – CASUALTY (English):

This is one that I’ve found a few times. “Casualidad” in Spanish means coincidence; chance. “Casualty” in English means victim.

COLEGIO (Spanish) – COLLEGE (English):

Although both refer to places where people study, they don’t refer to the same place. “Colegio” in Spanish means school. “College” in English means university.

EMBARAZADA (Spanish) – EMBARRASSED (English):

This is a very common one! “Embarazada” in Spanish means pregnant. “Embarrassed” in English means ashamed.

ÉXITO (Spanish) – EXIT (English):

This one became very famous because of a very popular ad for an online English learning platform. “Éxito” in Spanish means success; hit. “Exit” in English means a way out (of somewhere).

INTRODUCIR (Spanish) – INTRODUCE (English):

This one really confuses people sometimes. “Introducir” in Spanish means to insert. “Introduce” in English means to present someone.

LARGO (Spanish) – LARGE (English):

One of the most common and difficult to make people understand the difference. “Largo” in Spanish means long. “Large” in English means big.

LIBRERÍA (Spanish) – LIBRARY (English):

This one is one of the most infamous ones! “Librería” in Spanish means bookstore. “Library” in English means a public book-lending place (“biblioteca” in Spanish).

PRETENDER (Spanish) – PRETEND (English):

They do look very similar! “Pretender” in Spanish means to attempt; to woo. “Pretend” in English means to fake; to act as if.

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There are many more “false friends”, but I decided to start with some of the most common ones, or at least the ones I’ve seen more often.

Can you think of any others? If so, make sure to share them in the comments, I’d love to hear from you!

I’d like to thank “Day Translations” for sponsoring this post. You can check out their website here: https://www.daytranslations.com/

This is my last blog post of the year! I wish you the most wonderful holidays and see you in 2022!

XX

Content Editor, Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

Content Editor

Hi everyone!

Today I want to talk about what it means to be a Content Editor for a language-learning platform.

Officially, as of September, I became the Spanish Content Editor for FluentU, a language-learning platform that has been in the business since around 2010. They started with Asian languages (Chinese, Korean, and Japanese) and then moved to English, French, Spanish, Russian, German, Italian, and Portuguese.

The previous Editor left some months ago, so I was offered the position. It meant more work and responsibility, but also more money. I accepted the challenge! After a very arduous and long training period, I finally became their Spanish Content Editor or CE, as we call it internally.

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Being a Content Editor entails many tasks, mainly:

Searching for new videos on YouTube: FluentU works with YouTube videos, so I have to look for new videos to upload to their platform. The idea is that users can learn Spanish from everyday conversations and songs, trailers, and other formats.

Uploading new videos to their platform: Once I find videos that are not yet on their platform and that are helpful to learn Spanish (they have to be school-friendly because several teachers use the videos to teach their students), the Head of Content has to check them and give you their authorization.

Transcribe and translate the videos (captions): When the videos are already uploaded to the platform, you have to transcribe them (create the captions) and translate those captions into English. The right timing of each caption is very important.

Editing: This is the most important task for an Editor. Once the captions are ready, you need to check that all the words (annotations) are properly mapped. Mapped? Yes, FluentU’s captions are interactive, which means that each word of a caption (called an annotation) has a definition and two to three examples of how the word is used. And each word can have several annotations depending on the meaning or usage of the word for each specific caption. I know, it is tricky! Prepositions are the words with the most annotations!

Text to Sound (TTS): After all the editing is finished for a video, you need to convert the text of the captions into sound, for the sound feature of the platform.

Publish: Finally, you get to publish your video on the platform! This means that the video becomes available for all the users who are learning Spanish.

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Even though it takes a lot of work, it is very satisfying to be able to add new videos to the platform for the users to learn Spanish. Of course, I also deal with the users’ feedback which, most of the time, is very helpful!

So, this is, in a nutshell, what my Content Editor job entails. Have you ever worked as an editor, if so in which area or field? How was your experience? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments. And don’t forget to hit the subscribe button!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Content Editor, Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

International Translation Day 2021

Hello everyone!

Tomorrow is the International Translation Day! So, today’s post is about what this past year has been for me as a freelance translator. I did the same last year, and you can check out that post here International Translation Day 2020

I am happy to tell you that my work with #FluentU continues, and now as a Content Editor of their Spanish service. After almost two years of working with them as their English to Spanish Content Localizer, they gave me the chance of becoming an Editor. I will write more about that in a future post.

Also, I am working with a new client, a translation agency that has a presence in the US and Spain. Currently, we are working on a medical forms project. Before that, I worked on a COVID-19 short project. They pay by the hour instead of by word, which I find very interesting. I recently wrote about that; you can read it here Rate Per Word

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I worked on an audio-recording project. It was for a client working on a similar AI service for smart devices, like Siri and Alexa. I had to record several sentences at different speeds while making sure that each recording was detected by their software, and it was clear. This was something different but quite fun to do!

As far as social media, last year around this same time I had 1,300+ followers on Instagram. A year later, I have a little over 2,200 followers… almost a thousand more followers in one year! I am so grateful to everyone who has decided to follow me and likes my posts, and my page in general. This goes beyond any expectations I had.

In this past year, I also had the opportunity to get in touch with a wonderful local group of translators and interpreters. They hold monthly Zoom meetings, and although I haven’t been able to attend all of them, the ones that I have attended were so amazing! It is great to be able to talk about different topics from our field. Great collaborations have resulted from this!

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I know this past year wasn’t easy, I feel that! Still, I am happy about my accomplishments so far. I love being a translator! And being able to do what I love as my job… that’s just the best feeling in the world! I am very lucky to be able to do this.

Happy International Translation Day!! I hope you get to celebrate it in the best way possible! And also, tomorrow is International Podcast Day! Congratulations to all those amazing translators and interpreters who have a podcast! If you’d like to know which are my favorite translation/language podcast, check it out here My Favorite Podcasts

Thanks for reading this post! Let me know in the comments what you think of it, and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX