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Sin categoría, Translation

Agency vs Direct Client

Hello everyone!

This time I want to talk about the differences in working as a freelance translator with a translation agency versus working with a direct client.

In my experience, you can have a good working experience with both, but there are some important differences.

Let’s do pros and cons lists for both!

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Pros of working with a translation agency:

  • Usually, they are big companies with experience in the field.
  • They tend to be more trustworthy when it comes to payments (there are exceptions) and offer several payment methods.
  • Their client portfolio can include important corporations that prefer to work with agencies than directly with a translator.
  • Some agencies are a big deal in the industry, and if you manage to work with at least one of them, it can be a great addition to your resumé.

Cons of working with agencies:

  • They tend to pay really low rates because the biggest part of the clients’ payments is for them.
  • They take longer to pay. Normally, agencies can take from 30 to 60 days to pay, which is quite a lot of time, especially if this is your only income.
  • Sometimes you might get to work with a difficult PM or with different PMs for each project, which can create doubt and confusion.
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Pros of working with direct clients:

  • Their rates are better because there is no middle-man involved.
  • They can pay faster, some pay within days of receiving the translation, it depends on their internal payment procedures.
  • You get to work directly with the person who needs the translation, so the communication is much more direct and flows with ease.
  • They tend to offer long-term projects, that in the end are way more convenient than a bunch of little projects here and there.

Cons of working with direct clients:

  • They might not respect your “working hours”. If they need to tell you something they consider urgent, they probably write or call you at any time of the day, even during the weekends.
  • Sometimes, if they are not familiar with how translation works, they might ask for really ridiculous deadlines. Who hasn’t had a client asking for an “urgent” translation for “today” at 5 pm on a Friday? 😉
  • You have to do some research to see if they are reliable, especially when it comes to payments. You can ask colleagues who have worked with them or even asked them for references (if they ask you for references, you can do the same!).
  • If your primary contact is not familiar with your work, you might find it hard to make them understand why the project would take as long as it would and why the cost is what it is.

There are many more pros and cons, I am just presenting a short version of it, but if you can you think of any other important pros and cons, let me know in the comments!

In the meantime, have a great day and I cannot wait to hear all about you! Remember to subscribe to my blog!

 

 

Content Editor, Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

International Translation Day 2021

Hello everyone!

Tomorrow is the International Translation Day! So, today’s post is about what this past year has been for me as a freelance translator. I did the same last year, and you can check out that post here International Translation Day 2020

I am happy to tell you that my work with #FluentU continues, and now as a Content Editor of their Spanish service. After almost two years of working with them as their English to Spanish Content Localizer, they gave me the chance of becoming an Editor. I will write more about that in a future post.

Also, I am working with a new client, a translation agency that has a presence in the US and Spain. Currently, we are working on a medical forms project. Before that, I worked on a COVID-19 short project. They pay by the hour instead of by word, which I find very interesting. I recently wrote about that; you can read it here Rate Per Word

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I worked on an audio-recording project. It was for a client working on a similar AI service for smart devices, like Siri and Alexa. I had to record several sentences at different speeds while making sure that each recording was detected by their software, and it was clear. This was something different but quite fun to do!

As far as social media, last year around this same time I had 1,300+ followers on Instagram. A year later, I have a little over 2,200 followers… almost a thousand more followers in one year! I am so grateful to everyone who has decided to follow me and likes my posts, and my page in general. This goes beyond any expectations I had.

In this past year, I also had the opportunity to get in touch with a wonderful local group of translators and interpreters. They hold monthly Zoom meetings, and although I haven’t been able to attend all of them, the ones that I have attended were so amazing! It is great to be able to talk about different topics from our field. Great collaborations have resulted from this!

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I know this past year wasn’t easy, I feel that! Still, I am happy about my accomplishments so far. I love being a translator! And being able to do what I love as my job… that’s just the best feeling in the world! I am very lucky to be able to do this.

Happy International Translation Day!! I hope you get to celebrate it in the best way possible! And also, tomorrow is International Podcast Day! Congratulations to all those amazing translators and interpreters who have a podcast! If you’d like to know which are my favorite translation/language podcast, check it out here My Favorite Podcasts

Thanks for reading this post! Let me know in the comments what you think of it, and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Content Marketing, Copywriting, Social Media, Translation

More Than Just Translations

Hello everyone!

Today I want to talk about how as translators we can actually do a lot more than just translate.

Let’s talk about different language-related areas for translators.

Transcription

Transcription varies from translation in that it involves audio or video as the source instead of a document. You have to listen to the audio and transcribe it in a document along with the corresponding time codes.

Most of the times, the audio will be in your native language, but it can also be in your second one. And you might be asked to transcribe and translate an audio, which means that you have to transcribe the audio and then translate it. I work with English and Spanish (Spanish being my native language), so I could get an audio in Spanish to transcribe it, and then translate it into English. It could also be the other way around.

Copywriting

Copywriting is the process of writing persuasive marketing and promotional materials that motivate people to take some form of action, such as make a purchase, click on a link, donate to a cause, or schedule a consultation.

These materials can include written promotions that are published in print or online. They can also include materials that are spoken, such as scripts used for videos or commercials.

The text in these materials is known as “copy,” hence the name “copywriting.”

This is a sort of project that you will most likely work on in your native language.

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Localization

Language localization is the process of adapting a product’s translation to a specific country or region. It is the second phase of a larger process of product translation and cultural adaptation to account for differences in distinct markets, a process known as internationalization and localization.

It doesn’t always have to be a product or a marketing campaign. You can also localize video games and language-learning websites like I do with FluentU. I localize their English videos into Spanish for Latin American learners of English.

Subtitling

Subtitling is the process of adding text to any audio-visual media to express the message that is being spoken. Essentially, subtitles are a written abridgment of the spoken audio. They allow people to read and understand what is being said, even if they don’t understand the language of the speakers. And without subtitles, it would not be possible to grasp the subtleties contained in verbal communications.

Subtitles can basically be added to anything that includes moving pictures, but are most commonly used on film and television, promotional and corporate videos, and increasingly becoming more popular on YouTube and internet videos.

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Language Consultancy

Language consultancy consists of the analysis of a client’s language needs in order to develop solutions that optimize the translation process. This may include support in the drafting of documents or the analysis of document workflows or special projects. The workload for this type of service depends greatly on the complexity of each individual case.

Cultural Consultancy

Cultural consultancy is similar to language consultancy, but in this case, it is more about providing feedback about cultural aspects than language aspects. For instance, I did a cultural consultancy for a video game that took place in the former Maya and Inca empires, so they wanted someone from either culture to help them reassure that the cultural aspects presented in the video game were as close as possible to the original ones, to make it as credible as possible for the users.

Transcreation

Transcreation is the merger of two words: translation and creation. It’s an intricate form of translating that preserves the original intent, context, emotion, and tone. Originally conceived by marketing and advertising professionals, the goal of transcreation is to duplicate the message thoughtfully and seamlessly, without audiences realizing a translation ever occurred. The finished product should give the audience an identical emotional experience as the source message.

Have you worked in any of these areas before? If not, which ones interest you the most? I would love to read you in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe!

Until the next time, take and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Copywriting, Social Media, Translation

Rate Per Word

Hello everyone!

Today I want to talk about an interesting subject that I just heard about. Is the rate per word for translation and proofreading becoming extinct?

I recently listened to the latest episode from “Marketing Tips for Translators” by Tess Whitty (you can find it on all podcast platforms). She answered some questions from her listeners, including if getting paid per word is a tradition that is starting to disappear.

According to Tess, getting paid per translated or proofread word is not fair. We are not just delivering “words.” We are delivering a whole document in a different language in an understandable way. So, we are getting paid for our knowledge, our experience, our preparation, our talent; not just for “words.”

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I have to say that I agree with Tess. As translators, we don’t just translate words. We make sure that those words become a whole that is understandable in our native language (or other). So why should we be paid just by the output of words?

Two alternative options are getting paid by the hour or by project.

Being paid by the hour is a good choice, but you definitely need to know how long it takes you to translate a certain number of words or pages in order to calculate your total rate and your delivery time.

Also, not many agencies accept to pay by the hour, except maybe for proofreading or audiovisual translations. And you would need to work with a timer app that you agree with the client so that you can log in there your activity and the client can verify how many hours you worked on the project.

As a localizer, I usually get paid by the hour. I rarely get paid by word. I can also get paid by project if it is a one-time kind of gig, but if it is a recurrent job, then companies prefer to pay by the hour.

But for translation, I have to say that I might prefer to get paid by project, especially for those that don’t have many words. By examining the source document, you can determine how much you would charge the client. It might take some negotiation, but in the end, you are going to get paid more than per word, and it just makes more sense.

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Getting paid by project is getting paid by the whole package, not just by how many words you translate. Of course, it can have a downside. If you don’t calculate properly the amount to charge the client, you are still going to get underpaid. This is why it is very important to take your time to prepare a proper quotation, even if it takes a bit longer.

In the end, the important thing is to get paid fairly for the work we do and make sure both agencies and clients are clear about that. And although getting paid per word might be starting to disappear in some countries in Europe and the US, it is not widespread enough around the world.

So, which kind of payment do you prefer? Let me know in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe.

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

Collaborating with Colleagues

Hello everyone!

Today, I want to talk about one of the most important parts of knowing how to network: collaborating with fellow translators.

Recently, I’ve been lucky to become part of a wonderful group of local (Guatemalan) translators and interpreters, who meet via Zoom once a month to discuss different topics about our industry.

And although I just started attending these wonderful meetings, the feeling of collaboration and thirst for learning from our colleagues is amazing!

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I am also glad to be able to contribute a little with my experience. It is so nice when you hear that a colleague has gone through a similar situation as you, or that they just translated a type of document you’ve never translated.

Getting to know each one of them and their experiences as translators and interpreters has definitely enriched my life, both personally and professionally.

I am also very happy that I was able to collaborate with a colleague recently. I received information about a translation project that I knew I couldn’t take on, so I forwarded it to a colleague to see if she was interested and had time for it. She accepted!

This is a win-win situation. You don’t tell your client that you can’t take on a project, and you help a colleague. She did an amazing job with the project, plus she’s really professional.

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I’ve always heard that translators are jealous of each other, and therefore, they don’t like to share information with their competition. This is not true, at least not in my experience. We should work together as a community to help all its members grow.

I like the word community, I definitely feel part of a wonderful community of translators who are generous with their knowledge and their advice. Only by working together in harmony, can we actually achieve great things in the industry.

Tell me about your experience. Do you belong to a similar community? I can’t wait to read you in the comments! And don’t forget to subscribe!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

Website Translation

Hello everyone!

Today I want to talk about “Website Translation”. Do you translate websites often? I have translated a few, and I thought I’d share with you what I’ve learned so far about it.

E-commerce platforms, company websites, landing pages, apps, and other similar platforms have a common denominator – communication.

All these platforms are created to communicate a message to as many people as possible. In fact, the online environment can be the one-way ticket to success for any brand regardless of size and product or service. The trick is to know how to grab and retain people’s attention enough to make them want to know more.

For this, you must find creative ways to deliver attention-grabbing and concise content, in a format and shape that’s easily shared and understood.

However, the situation is more complex and nuanced than this. While it’s true that your audience is online, so is your competition, various sources of entertainment, news & media outlets, lots of education platforms, and social media. This means you have to fight hard for people’s attention, and the only way to do so is by creating relevant and engaging content.

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The importance of translating your website:

The success of a global brand is defined by the way marketers understand how to approach the local culture and population. This is a process called localization and starts with the translation of the website into the local language.

Big and small e-commerce companies will have to consider translating products and services if they want to be successful. This is one of the reasons why Amazon has such great success overseas. They established several hubs in the most populated areas of the globe and the site is available in the most popular language of the area.

While it may be more difficult to follow in their footsteps in the current economic environment, it doesn’t mean you can’t use the power of language to grow your audience.

Culture and Language:

A successful website translation is not just about language; it’s also about integrating local culture and habits. Linguists call this localization.

Unlike regular translation, localization also addresses non-textual and cultural components to create an accurate depiction of a product or service for a specific group of people. It’s about adapting the message so locals can grasp all its nuances.

All successful global websites, apps, video games, or any other type of content is the result of both translation and localization.

Furthermore, localization is not just for foreign countries who speak a different language. A website with content in English will still have to use localization techniques in order to become appealing to audiences in Australia or the UK.

The best way to see how localization works is by taking a look at the case of sportive footwear. What Americans consider sneakers are called trainers in the UK and runners in Ireland. Now, all these words define one type of product, but if you try to sell sneakers in the UK, you won’t be successful because people don’t understand what you’re offering.

In summary, it’s not a case of culture vs. language but rather a case of using language and culture to promote your brand.

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How to translate it?

The DIY Approach
If you have the necessary knowledge to produce reliable and high-quality translations, then it is possible to do it yourself. However, it is not an approach we would recommend since it requires a great deal of knowledge from two opposing fields: language and web technology.

The DIY approach only works when you’re running a small website or creating stand-alone landing pages for a language you know very well. Otherwise, if the website is larger (like an e-commerce platform) you should hire a translator.

Professional Collaboration Approach
You are willing to invest in a strong marketing department, right? You are also ready to send people and investigate the market you want to enter. So, it would be unwise to not consider a collaboration with an experienced translator and localizer!

It’s also important to keep in mind that you will need translations of the website content, products, marketing materials, and legal documents (for contracts, agreements, labor laws, and more). As such, you will need assistance from linguists with varied expertise.

Website Translation vs. Content Translation
We’re currently living in a content economy. This means that brands must keep creating engaging content to grab people’s attention and lead them to their landing pages. Once there, viewers must be welcomed by a different type of content that will convince them to become customers.

As such, there is a clear distinction between website and content translation. If you only need to translate your website once, content is something that must be produced at a constant rate. Content must also be relevant and topical in order to stand out in the ocean of new content created every day.

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Furthermore, different audiences require content in different formats. And, depending on the geographic location of your audience, you may have to use different channels. This implies knowing which social media platform works in a specific region, whether blogging is well-received or not, and more.

Lastly, successful brands will also keep track of content produced by their users such as reviews, comments, or blog articles. This type of content has a sense of urgency to it, as you can lose momentum if the reply comes too late. As a result, collaboration with a translator or a translation agency that can provide input in local culture and habits is more than necessary to keep track of various campaigns.

Let me know what you think about this subject in the comments and don’t forget to subscribe.

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Content Localizer, Content Marketing, Social Media, Translation

Content Marketing

Hello everyone! Today I want to talk about Content Marketing for translators.

We think that Content Marketing is not important for translators but actually, it can make a big difference in your business.

Content marketing is one of the main tactics every brand and business uses, making it no exception to the translation industry.

Here are some important concepts in Content Marketing that I’ve learned in different webinars and I wanted to share with you.

Definition of Content Marketing

Content marketing consists of marketing actions that revolve around various types of content created in a timely and relevant manner that will get more leads, sales, and allow brands to reach their goals.

The types of content mentioned can be anything from blog articles and email marketing content to infographics, social media posts, or e-books.

Content marketing aims to get more traffic to a website, generate more leads, and allow marketers to distinguish between qualified and non-qualified leads. But that is not all, as great content helps brands to establish their brand name as authorities in their niche and build a community that will be engaged and interested from the beginning.

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The Content

What do your customers like? Why do they need translation services? And most important, how do they search for those services?

If your prospects care about legal sworn translators, this would be where you need to focus. If they’re looking for “English to Spanish legal translators in Guatemala city”, this is the keyword you need to create content around.

Keywords will give you topics on your blog posts, while blog posts and your website will provide you with enough material to base your social media posts around.

SEO

Now let’s talk about the basics of how the translation industry needs content that search engines will love.

This is where SEO comes into play. Creating content that search engines will notice is the best way to get more people to your website. It’s also the most cost-efficient way, as it is free.

Use online tools to help you understand and optimize posts for the keywords your prospects use, as I mentioned before. The best keywords are the long-tail keywords – notice the “English to Spanish legal translators in Guatemala city” above? This is precisely the keyword that interests your prospective clients.

Use popular keywords with a high search volume but low competition for your posts to rank quickly. And don’t forget to use your main keyword everywhere!

Also, don’t forget to research keyword variants. Repeating just one keyword paves the way for a dull post that prospects won’t enjoy. Use your tools to find variations that prospects are searching for and include them in your posts.

Generating Leads

If content marketing were only about posts, then it wouldn’t have worked, no matter how hard a marketer tried.

And there is no better way to know it’s working than seeing more leads coming into your translation business, getting to know your work, and interacting with you. But how is this going to happen?

You will need lead generation tools, such as landing pages, subscription forms, and lead magnets.

The lead magnet is something people will expect in exchange for their email addresses. It can be anything. From an e-book and a template to a free translation or a sample of your work.

Again, use SEO tools to find the right keywords and make sure that your prospects will bump into your landing page or your website and subscription form.

Now, let’s assume that you’ve created your content and have captured the email of as many leads as you would’ve liked. What could you do next?

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Distribution

Your efforts in making content such as blog posts, videos, posts on social media, even interactive elements like games will all be in vain if there is no channel where you can distribute them.

So, first of all, you need to create social media profiles that will resonate with your audience and will help you attract more people and then take all steps necessary.

Sharing your posts on your translation business’s Facebook and Instagram pages will be helpful as well. Ask your audience to share your post with their followers and ask for feedback or a general question that will warrant engagement.

The more the engagement, the better the algorithm reacts, and this goes for all social media platforms.

If one of your posts performs well, you can always repurpose it and have more content to distribute to your social media platforms.

Content marketing can help all industries, including the translation industry, provided you create useful and informative content.

Do you have any experience with content marketing? Let’s start a conversation in the comments!

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Designs.ai Affiliate Logomaker (New Brand) 728x90 Banner
Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

Women’s History Month 2021

Hello everyone!

March isn’t over yet, and that means that we are still celebrating Women’s History Month. On March 8, we celebrated this year’s International Women’s Day.

Today I wanted to share with you a bit about how Women’s History Month got started. Thanks to the Women’s History Organization for the information.

Women’s History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a “Women’s History Week” celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women’s Day. The movement spread across the US as other communities initiated their own Women’s History Week celebrations the following year.

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In 1980, a consortium of women’s groups and historians—led by the National Women’s History Project (now the National Women’s History Alliance)—successfully lobbied for national recognition. In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th, 1980 as National Women’s History Week.

Subsequent Presidents continued to proclaim a National Women’s History Week in March until 1987 when Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamation designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

The National Women’s History Alliance selects and publishes the yearly theme. The theme for Women’s History Month in 2021 captures the spirit of these challenging times. Since many of the women’s suffrage centennial celebrations originally scheduled for 2020 were curtailed, the National Women’s History Alliance is extending the annual theme for 2021 to “Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to Be Silenced.

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Of course, this celebration has transcended borders and it is no longer just celebrated in the US. Many countries around the world celebrate Women’s History Month in March, whether it is official or not.

But we shouldn’t celebrate women just one month of the year; women should always be celebrated. The mothers, the daughters, the sisters, the friends, the colleagues, the neighbors…all the women in our lives should be celebrated every single day.

During this celebration, we often talk about the women we admire. The woman I admire the most is my mom. She’s the strongest, most wonderful woman I know. She’s a great example and inspiration to follow not just for me, but also for my nieces.

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Thank you to all the strong and amazing women reading this, and also to the incredible men who always support and stand by us!

I’d love to know how you are celebrating Women’s History Month! Make sure to leave me your comments about it and don’t forget to subscribe to my blog!

As a reminder, you can get a 15% discount on a beautiful swimsuit from Bright Swimwear by using my code: ILDU15. If you want to know more about my collaboration with them, don’t miss this blog post Brand Ambassador!

By the way, if you don’t yet have a website and have been thinking about starting one, or if you’d like to create a new one, here is a gift if you do so with WordPress. If you use this link to start your website, you’ll receive a USD 25.00 credit towards the plan you choose: https://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/9YVyPkAtvbLBWjAwkPxx/

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Designs.ai Affiliate Logomaker (Digital Presence) 728x90 Banner
Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

10 Myths About Translators

Hi everyone!

This is my second blog post of the year and the 60th overall!

Today I want to talk about some myths related to translators. If you are a translator, you probably already heard all of them 😉

Translators like working for free

Unless it is a volunteer translation or if translation is not your main source of income, no translators don’t like working for free. Translating is like any other job and we like to get compensated for the work we do. Just because we work from home, doesn’t mean that we don’t like to receive the same perks as if we worked in a regular office.

Translators must be available 24/7

Unless you don’t want to have any sleep or eat or have any life at all, no translators are not available 24/7. Like any other job, we have business hours and most of us don’t work on weekends and take holidays. Again, just because we are freelancers doesn’t mean that we have to be “connected” all the time. And we have to make sure that our clients understand that. So, please don’t advertise yourself as being available 24/7 if you want to have a healthy balance between work and your personal life.

Anyone who speaks two languages can be a translator

This one I hear all the team. You can speak, two, three, five, eight languages, but that doesn’t make you a translator in any of them. To become a translator, you have to prepare yourself, you have to study for a university career. You may have a native inclination for languages and translation but to become a fully accomplished translator, you need to obtain certain skills that you can only learn or improve by studying them.

Translators and Interpreters are the same thing

Another one that is used all the time. Ok, let’s make this one easy: translators convey their work in writing, while interpreters convey their work orally. And no, not all translators are interpreters and vice versa. Although some people study to become both, most people become just one. Becoming an interpreter is a whole other ball game.

Machine translation will take over translators’ work

Even with machine translation, you’ll always need a translator to review the work made by the machine. MT can be helpful for large projects but the translations themselves will always need human eyes to make sure that all the translations are properly done. Usually, a machine won’t recognize among genders, singular or plurals, proper names, and so forth. MTPE or Machine Translation Post-Editing is a job that will always need a human translator.

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Translators can translate any subject matter as long as the material is in a language they know

As translators, we can translate almost anything, but we also tend to specialize in certain areas that we are more familiar with. For instance, I am a Legal Sworn Translator so I have no problems translating legal documents, but I don’t have a lot of experience with Forex and cryptocurrency, so I know that I would not accept translations from those fields. I could probably do the translations using specialized glossaries and dictionaries, but it will never be as good as when done by a translator who has experience in that field.

Translators can deliver any translation with little or no turn-around time

No, we can’t. Clients want high-quality work, but that kind of work cannot be delivered with little or almost no turn-around time. Remember that besides translating, we also proofread our translations. We need a reasonable amount of time to make sure we deliver our best work.

Translators shouldn’t negotiate or increase their fees

Not an easy thing to do or understand. When you start working as a freelance translator your fees won’t be very high, but as you become a more experienced translator, you can and should negotiate, renegotiate and increase your fees. Your clients can’t expect you to use the same fees that you started with forever.

All translators will deliver the same translation

The process of translations is quite complex, and each translator has her or his approach to the language being used. Let’s say that three translators take on the same source document, you will end up with three different translations. The variations probably won’t be too many or too different, but you have to consider where each translator is from, what their background is, if they are speakers of different forms of the language (for example, if they translate into Spanish from Spain or from Latin America).

Translators don’t mind doing unpaid tests

This is a huge myth and misconception. We are not against taking tests for clients before they grant us a project, but those tests should be paid. We are dedicating time and effort to it, so we should be compensated for that.

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Can you think of more myths about translators? Please share them in the comments and I’ll make sure to share them in a follow-up post 🙂 And don’t forget to subscribe!

As a reminder, you can get a 15% discount on a beautiful swimsuit from Bright Swimwear by using my code: ILDU15. If you want to know more about my collaboration with them, don’t miss this blog post Brand Ambassador!

By the way, if you don’t yet have a website and have been thinking about starting one, or if you’d like to create a new one, here is a gift if you do so with WordPress. If you use this link to start your website, you’ll receive a USD 25.00 credit towards the plan you choose: https://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/9YVyPkAtvbLBWjAwkPxx/

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

Designs.ai Affiliate Designs.ai 468x60 Banner
Content Localizer, Social Media, Translation

A New Beginning

Hello everyone!

This is my first blog post of 2021! It is great to be back, with my energies recharged after my vacation for the holidays. It was great to disconnect for a few days, I definitely feel ready to start this year.

Every year gives us an opportunity for a new beginning, and we seldom take it. After such a rough year 2020 was, I think most of us feel a bit reluctant to get excited about starting a new year, like we don’t want to jinx it!

But we should leave 2020 in the past and give 2021 a chance. The pandemic situation is not going to change any time soon. It is something that we need to learn to live with, but at least we already know this and if we accept it, we’ll be able to move forward.

Photo by Polina Kovaleva on Pexels.com

This year I want to change a couple of things. During the holidays I was able to think about what I want from this new beginning. Here are some of the things I’m doing different this year:

  1. I’ll only publish one blog post per month. I published two per month last year, and although I do enjoy writing, it gets more difficult to find new topics and it does take a lot of my time. I’d rather publish more quality content than quantity.
  2. I’ll only publish posts on social media three days per week. After more than a year of posting daily, I’ve decided to bring it down to three posts. This will help me not only to produce more quality and original posts, but it will also free some of my time. Managing your social media by yourself can be like having a second job!
  3. I’m trying to be more friendly with the environment. For a couple of years now, I’ve started replacing different products with natural, organic, or vegan ones. From skin and hair care products to toothbrushes, and other household items, little by little we’ve been transitioning. I know it doesn’t sound like much, but if we all did something like this, we would be able to help our environment in a big way.
  4. I’m taking more time for myself. If the pandemic has taught me anything, is that I need to take care of myself to take care of others. Taking more time off, finding time to meditate and relax, and improving skin and hair care routines are great ways to focus on my well-being.
  5. Engage more. Another reason for publishing less material on social media is to focus on engaging more with my followers and the accounts I follow. Networking is essential, but you need time to do it.
  6. Support more local small businesses and entrepreneurs. During the pandemic, so many new small businesses were created, mainly due to the lack of employment. As an entrepreneur myself, I know how important it is to support other entrepreneurs and small businesses.
  7. I didn’t just rest during the holidays, I also took the time to really clean out my house, especially my room and closet. I got rid of many things that I didn’t even remember I had, and now there’s more space for other things and it all looks so much better!
  8. In this same line, I deleted profiles and accounts that I don’t use anymore or that never gave me any results.
  9. I also want to get rid of any negativity or pessimism. I want to keep a more positive outlook on life, instead of bringing myself down with anxiety.
  10. And last, but not least, I want to be kinder. The truth is we never really know what people are really going through. They might seem ok or even have a smile on their faces, but internally they might be battling all sorts of problems. This is why I think we should always be kind to one another, and I definitely want to practice this more. A kind word or gesture can go a long way!

They are not exactly goals; they are more like ideas of how to get better both as a person and as a professional. Self-improvement never ends!

Photo by Tairon Fernandez on Pexels.com

2021 has had a great start for me. FluentU has agreed to raise my rate due to how happy they are with my work, and I just landed a small Portuguese to Spanish translation project for one of my most important clients.

Another great thing that has happened, is that you can hear my voice on the Translation Confessional podcast! The lovely Rafa Lombardino invited me to leave a voice message on her podcast page, and I made the cut! You can listen to the episode “Client Education” on any podcast platform. Here is the link to listen to it in YouTube!

How is 2021 treating you so far? Did you set any goals or resolutions? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe!

As a reminder, you can get a 15% discount on a beautiful swimsuit from Bright Swimwear by using my code: ILDU15. If you want to know more about my collaboration with them, don’t miss this blog post Brand Ambassador!

By the way, if you don’t yet have a website and have been thinking about starting one, or if you’d like to create a new one, here is a gift if you do so with WordPress. If you use this link to start your website, you’ll receive a USD 25.00 credit towards the plan you choose: https://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/9YVyPkAtvbLBWjAwkPxx/

Until the next time, take care and stay safe!

XX

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Brand Ambassador, Social Media, Translation

Brand Ambassador

Hi everyone!

In my last blog post of the year, I’d like to talk about my experience as Brand Ambassador for Bright Swimwear, a Swedish-based boutique brand.

A couple of months ago, they reached out to me to become their Brand Ambassador. To be honest, I thought it was either a mistake or a scam, or a joke. This had never happened to me before, and I didn’t think my IG content showed in any way that I belonged in that category.

So, I very polity declined, stating that I did not consider myself to be the right person for the task.

But a couple of weeks after that, they wrote again, explaining what their brand and Brand Ambassador program are all about. Once I had this information and checked out that both their website and IG account were legit, I decided to take the leap!

For someone like me, who is very shy and doesn’t like going around showing herself in pictures or videos, accepting to pose in a swimsuit was a major commitment.

I had to, first, overcome my fear of showing myself in pictures. I always feel like I don’t know how to pose or what to do with my hands. I always take weird pictures, so I knew I would need help from friends and family to make it happen.

They are the ones who ultimately convinced me to participate. They said it would be an adventure, and I would also have the opportunity to expose my brand to a broader audience.

Once I accepted, I got my discount code to share it with my family, friends, and followers. Of course, I also got one of their swimsuits, the Cora. For as long as I can remember, I always wanted a red swimsuit, and now finally, I have one!

And not just any swimsuit. They are all eco-friendly and handmade. They use the leftovers of the fabric to make the cute little bags the swimsuits come in. I must say it is the best swimsuit I’ve ever owned!

Weeks went by, I got my swimsuit, but now I needed to plan the photoshoot. Not an easy task, I had to find a beautiful place, preferably with a pool, that wasn’t too far away from the city.

It took some help and time to find the perfect venue. Of course, I also needed a good photographer. For this again, my family and friends stepped in. They even did my makeup and hair! I felt very fancy by the time they finished dolling me up!

Then came the day for the photoshoot. It was on a glorious Saturday! The weather in Antigua Guatemala, where the venue, Aqua Antigua, is located, was the most amazing I had ever experienced there. It got really hot too, which made the posing a bit difficult (too much heat and sweating). So, we took brakes, until finally a nice wind came along and helped refresh the environment.

I had so much fun and ended up so tired! I had no idea that posing for like over 1,000 pictures would wear me out, but it sure did!

The other tiring task was to choose from all the pictures taken, the ones that would actually appear on my social media accounts. It wasn’t an easy task, believe me. But in the end, I chose according to each of the posts I made. I am happy with the decision I made; I genuinely believe I shared the best pictures of myself I’ve ever seen (my friends and family also agree on that!).

If you haven’t seen my post, reel, and story, make sure to visit my Instagram profile. The pictures in this post are also from the same photoshoot and haven’t been shared before!

My gift for you is a 15% discount code to buy any swimsuit from Bright that your heart desires. My code is: ILDU15

Let me know in the comments if you buy a Bright Swimsuit and what your experience with it is like.

By the way, if you don’t yet have a website and have been thinking about starting one, or if you’d like to create a new one, here is a gift if you do so with WordPress. If you use this link to start your website, you’ll receive a USD 25.00 credit towards the plan you choose: https://wordpress.com/refer-a-friend/9YVyPkAtvbLBWjAwkPxx/

Until next year, take care and stay safe!

XX

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